SASB: CG-AA-430a.2; CG-AA-430b.3; CG-AA-440a.1; CG-HP-430a.1; FB-FR-430a.3
GRI: 304-2
UN SDGs: 14, 15
E | Published: July 21, 2022 | Last Updated: Oct. 4, 2022

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Our Aspiration

We aspire to become a regenerative company, one dedicated to placing nature and humanity at the center of our business practices. As such, Walmart and the Walmart Foundation have set a goal to help protect, more sustainably manage, or restore at least 50 million acres of land and 1 million square miles of ocean by 2030.

Key Goals & Metrics

Goal
Metric
FY2020
FY2021
FY2022
Walmart and the Walmart Foundation Goal: to help protect, more sustainably manage, or restore at least 50 million acres of land and 1 million square miles of ocean by 2030
Acres of land protected, more sustainably managed, or restoredNew goalForthcoming1
Square miles of ocean protected, more sustainably managed, or restoredNew goalForthcoming
Fostering More Sustainable Production of Commodities
Encourage Walmart’s suppliers to report progress on their nature goalsNumber of suppliers reporting through Project Gigaton’s nature pillar>4302
>550
Policies and position statementsForests Policy, Seafood Policy, Sustainable Row Crop Position Statement, and Walmart U.S. Pollinator Health Position
Ocean Commodities
Fresh & Frozen Seafood
By 2025, all Walmart U.S., Sam’s Club U.S., Walmart Canada, Walmart Mexico and Walmart Central America fresh, frozen, farmed and wild-caught seafood suppliers will source from fisheries that are third-party certified as sustainable, actively working toward certification or engaged in a fishery improvement project (FIP) or Aquaculture Improvement Project (AIP)3
Percentage of sustainably sourced fresh and frozen, wild-caught and farmed, seafood, based on supplier reportsWalmart U.S. & Sam’s Club: ~100%Walmart U.S.: ~100%.
Sam’s Club U.S.: ~100%
Walmart Canada: 89%
Walmart Mexico: 61%
Walmart Central America: 73%4
Walmart U.S.: ~99%
Sam's Club U.S.: ~99%
Walmart Canada: Forthcoming
Walmart Mexico: 82%
Walmart Central America: 76%5
Percentage of wild-caught, fresh and frozen seafood sustainably sourced, based on supplier reportsWalmart U.S.: 98%Walmart U.S.: 98%
Sam’s Club U.S.: ~100%
Walmart Canada: 88%
Walmart Mexico: 37%
Walmart Central America: 22%6
Walmart U.S.: 97%
Sam’s Club U.S.: ~99%
Walmart Canada: 91%
Walmart Mexico: 2%
Walmart Central America: 42%7
Percentage of fresh and frozen farmed seafood sustainably sourced, based on supplier reportsWalmart U.S. & Sam’s Club: 99%Walmart U.S.: 100%
Sam’s Club U.S.: 100%
Walmart Mexico: 84%
Walmart Central America: 83%8
Walmart U.S.: 99%
Sam’s Club U.S.: 99%
Walmart Canada: 97%
Walmart Mexico: 94%
Walmart Central America: 81%9
Canned Tuna
By 2025, Walmart U.S., Sam’s Club U.S. and Walmart Canada will require all canned light and white tuna suppliers to source from fisheries that are third-party certified as sustainable, actively working toward certification, or engaged in a fishery improvement project (FIP)10
Percentage of canned tuna sustainably sourced, based on supplier reports11Walmart U.S. (national and private brand): 35%
Sam’s Club U.S.: 3%
Walmart Canada: 34%12
Walmart U.S. (national and private brand): 70%
Sam’s Club U.S.: 50%
Walmart Canada: Forthcoming13
Forest Commodities
Coffee: Source private brand coffee more sustainablyPercentage of private brand coffee net sales that were sourced and certified as sustainable, based on supplier reports14Walmart U.S.: 100%15
Sam’s Club U.S.: 91%
Walmart U.S.: 100%
Sam’s Club U.S.: 92%
Total Walmart U.S. and Sam’s Club U.S.: 98%
Walmart U.S.: 100%
Sam’s Club U.S.: 97%
Total Walmart U.S. and Sam’s Club U.S.: 99%
Tea: Source 100% of Walmart U.S. private brand black and green tea bags and instant ice teas as certifiedPercentage of private brand black and green tea bags and instant iced teas sourced and certified as sustainable, based on supplier reports16100%17
Bananas & Pineapples: Source 100% of all Cavendish bananas and pineapples sold in Walmart U.S. and Sam’s Club U.S. stores and clubs from farms that have received third-party certifications18
Percentage of bananas and pineapples that were sourced and certified as sustainable, based on supplier reports19Walmart U.S. Bananas: 92%
Walmart U.S. Pineapples: 80%
Sam's Club U.S. Bananas: 96%
Sam's Club U.S. Pineapples: 82%
Walmart U.S. Bananas: 92%
Walmart U.S. Pineapples: 89%
Sam's Club U.S. Bananas: 100%
Sam's Club U.S. Pineapples: 96%

Walmart U.S. Bananas: 99%
Walmart U.S. Pineapples: 88%
Sam's Club U.S. Bananas: 99%
Sam's Club U.S. Pineapples: 82%
Palm Oil: 100% of palm oil in Walmart private-brand products sourced with no deforestation or conversion by 202520Percentage of supplier-reported palm oil volume in Walmart Inc. private brand products certified RSPO segregated or equivalent standards21~85% certified (includes mass balance/equivalent or segregated/higher)~90% certified (includes mass balance/equivalent or segregated/higher)10% certified segregated/higher
Pulp & Paper: Walmart private brand products made of pulp, paper, and timber will be sourced deforestation and conversion-free by 202522Percentage of supplier-reported pulp and paper volume in Walmart Inc. private brand products that is recyclable or certified as sustainable2397%90% 92%
Cellulosic Fibers: Ensure that none of the man-made cellulosic fibers sourced for Walmart U.S., Sam’s Club U.S., and Walmart Canada Private Brand apparel and home textile products are derived from ancient and endangered forests, or from endangered species’ habitats or other controversial sources24Percentage of man-made cellulosic fiber volume for Walmart U.S., Walmart Canada, and Sam's Club U.S. private brand apparel and home textile products sourced from fiber producers with verified low risk of sourcing from ancient or endangered forests25Walmart U.S.: 29%
Sam's Club U.S.: 48%
Walmart Canada: 10%
Grassland and Agricultural Commodities
Cotton: 100% of cotton volume for Walmart U.S. private brand apparel and home textile products sourced as "more sustainable" by 2025Percentage of cotton volume for Walmart U.S. private brand apparel and home textile products sourced as "more sustainable" cotton, based on supplier reports26Walmart U.S.: 68%31Walmart US: 77%
Row Crops: Encourage row crop suppliers to develop fertilizer optimization plansNumber of acres involved in fertilizer optimization or soil health practice programs, based on supplier reports>6 million acres>1.5 million acres>3 million acres
Number of suppliers participating in fertilizer optimization or soil health plans162450
Support Conservation and Restoration
Conserve one acre of land for every acre developed by Walmart U.S. storesTotal acres conserved through Acres for America since 2005>1.4 million acres>1.6 million acres>1.8 million acres
Development of “Place-Based Projects”
Develop, participate in, and connect suppliers with place-based initiatives that show potential to deliver positive nature impacts at the landscape and seascape levels

Current place-based and jurisdictional projects from which Walmart sources include: Pacific Island Tuna; Arkansas Rice

Walmart Foundation support for place-based and jurisdictional initiatives includes: Northern Great Plains cattle; Western and Central Pacific Ocean tuna fisheries; Northern Sumatra peatland forest; Southern High Plains cattle; Brazilian Amazon smallholders

Additional information on place-based initiatives, including projects supported Walmart and the Walmart Foundation, may be found in our FY22 Project Pipeline and on our Sustainability Hub.

Advocate For and Invest in Enablers
Create an environment that supports the protection, management, and restoration of natural ecosystemsTotal amount invested by Walmart Foundation to help preserve irreplaceable landscapes>$7.3 million>$7 million

Relevance to Our Business & Society

Many of the products that Walmart sells—from bananas to cotton sheets to shampoo—come from nature, or depend on ingredients that come from nature.

Nature provides services and resources to product supply chains and the wider economy worth around $125 trillion per year, according to WWF. These include climate regulation, freshwater, storm and flood protection, erosion and soil regulation, materials, pollination and energy that are essential to life—and business—on this planet.

Scientists tell us that the world has pushed its natural resources to the point of crisis, resulting in the degradation and loss of critical landscapes, a loss of biodiversity as species of plants and animals are eradicated, and the acceleration of climate change. The latest WWF Living Planet Index shows a 68 percent decrease in population sizes of mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles, and fish between 1970 and 2016. This crisis will impact life generally, including in the communities where we operate and in the places where products we sell originate.

Without action, this degradation of resources could make certain products too expensive to produce or altogether unavailable. Additionally, natural services everyone relies on—including water and air purification, crop pollination and disease control—could also be at risk. Lack of access to clean water, vital to all forms of life, is already impacting communities in many parts of the world. The World Health Organization estimates that one-in-four people do not have access to safe drinking water.

Stakeholders have called for Walmart and others to transform product supply chains toward a regenerative approach—one that restores, renews and replenishes nature—to help reverse negative trends and sustain critical resources for the future. Scientists estimate that a regenerative approach to agriculture and the restoration of nature can also provide around a third of the solution to climate change. Walmart and companies like us need to be part of the solution not only to maintain our social license to operate, but to uphold and continue to access the natural capital we all need to thrive.

Walmart’s Approach

Walmart and the Walmart Foundation have committed to help protect, more sustainably manage or restore at least 50 million acres of land and 1 million square miles of ocean by 2030 through the following strategies:

  • Set priorities for conservation, restoration, and better management of commodity production based on perspectives from leading NGOs, suppliers and other stakeholders regarding priority ecosystems and opportunities to enhance nature through better farming and fishery practices;
  • Foster more sustainable production of commodities such as beef, row crops, coffee, paper, and tuna to meet consumer demand while promoting forest, field, and ocean health through sourcing requirements, best practice sharing, supplier engagement, and industry consortia;
  • Support conservation and restoration of critical ecosystems through philanthropy and supplier engagement;
  • Encourage the development of “place-based projects” combining conservation, restoration, and sustainable commodity production to create positive economic, social, and environmental outcomes through Walmart private brand sourcing, supplier engagement, and philanthropy; and
  • Advocate for and invest in enablers of systemic change, such as public policy, measurement tools, certification programs, and capacity of organizations to accelerate adoption of better practices.

Key Strategies & Progress

Setting Aspirations | Sustainable Sourcing | Supporting Conservation and Restoration | Encouraging Place-Based Projects | Supporting Enablers

Setting Aspirations: Prioritizing Ecosystems and Outcomes for Nature

In collaboration with Conservation International, we identified critical landscapes and seascapes that have high value for nature, relate to our product sourcing footprint, and afford opportunities for Walmart, our suppliers, or non-governmental organization (NGO) collaborators to influence change. Those areas are grasslands, forests, and oceans.27

Grasslands and Agricultural Production

  • Grasslands ecosystems are important contributors to the food supply and provide important ecosystem services such as pollinator health, water management, carbon sequestration, and biodiversity.
  • Several commodities important to the Walmart assortment—including row crops28 and beef—come from agricultural regions near or within grassland ecosystems. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, roughly 29% of total U.S. land is dedicated to grassland pasture and rangeland, and 17% is used for cropland, much of it on former grassland.29
  • Our grasslands and regenerative agriculture initiatives focus primarily on better management of commodity production and avoidance of grasslands conversion, aiming to enhance soil health, water quality and quantity, pollinator health, and biodiversity while avoiding greenhouse gas emissions or even increasing sequestration of carbon.
Regenerative Agriculture
While there are multiple ways to define “regenerative agriculture,” for purposes of guiding action, we define it as an approach to farming and ranching that delivers increased value for the farmer/rancher, rural communities, and the planet by implementing locally relevant practices that restore and replenish the soils that are the foundation of all agricultural production, and by protecting and restoring the natural ecosystems that agricultural production is embedded in.

Through this flexible, outcomes-focused approach we can address climate change, improve farmer livelihoods, and rebuild the natural resources that current and future generations depend on.

Our regenerative agriculture strategy focuses on beef and row crops like wheat, corn/maize, soy, cotton, and rice. These commodities are foundational to the food and fiber products our customers count on. Rice, for example, is the primary staple for more than half the world's population, and corn is the most widely produced feed grain in the U.S.

In September 2021, Walmart and Sam's Club released a Row Crop Position Statement outlining farming and reporting best practices for our row crop suppliers. We believe these best practices will help our suppliers and their partners transition to a more sustainable and regenerative future in agricultural production.

We are asking our suppliers and the farmers who supply them to adopt practices, including:
  • Soil and nutrient management, including cover crops, conservation tillage, crop rotation, and “4R” nutrient management;
  • Pest management, including integrated pest management and beneficial insect habitats;
  • Water management plans;
  • Regenerative land management practices, including hedgerow plantings, management of riparian corridors, grassed waterways and constructed wetlands; and
  • Protecting priority areas by not planting row crops on recently cleared lands, and implementing conservation easements.
We believe that implementing these practices will drive value through increased crop yield resiliency, improved soil health, natural resource preservation, and, in many cases, increased profitability for the farmer. In support of our ambition, we are asking suppliers to set SMART goals and report on progress in helping farmers and ranchers implement regenerative agriculture practices through Project Gigaton.

Forests

  • Forests provide vital benefits to people and the planet: a home for millions of people that live in forests, habitat for a vast number of species, purification of air and water, carbon storage, and regulation of climate.
  • Globally, an estimated 1.6 billion people depend directly on forests for their livelihoods; palm oil, soy, beef, pulp and paper, coffee, cocoa, tea, and apparel/soft home products in the Walmart assortment may come from agricultural regions near or within forest ecosystems.
  • As a member of the Consumer Goods Forum’s (CGF) Forest Positive Coalition (FPC), we are building on the CGF’s 2010 resolution to achieve zero net deforestation in our supply chains. We participate in FPC commodity working groups to engage in stakeholder consultations throughout the year to develop commodity roadmaps and action plans to help deliver a forest positive future. We provide thought leadership, critical information around key commodities, and invest in credible landscape-level initiatives.
  • Our forest initiatives include conservation, restoration, and more sustainable management of commodity production systems that intersect with key forest ecosystems around the world. Our strategy includes enhancing traceability and transparency, building capacity with local organizations, supporting communities and livelihoods, fostering incentives and market access, and advancing holistic place-based and landscape-level solutions.

Oceans

  • Oceans are one of the main repositories of the world's biodiversity. According to the United Nations, oceans constitute over 90 percent of the habitable space on the planet and contain some 250,000 known species. The ocean, and the life therein, are critical to a healthy planet, supplying half of the oxygen we breathe and absorbing annually about 26 percent of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere.
  • Yet increasingly our oceans are being overfished. In June 2022, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the UN estimated that over 35 percent of global fisheries are already overfished, in large part due to illegal and destructive fishing. This unfortunate trend shows no signs of slowing. A 2021 Stanford University-led study estimated that global fish consumption will increase nearly 80 percent by 2050. The FAO also noted that in 2020 total fisheries and aquaculture production reached an all-time record of 214 million tonnes, a 3% increase from the previous 2018 record. Additionally, the FAO estimates that 3.3 billion people rely on seafood as one of their primary sources of protein and 600 million people rely on the fisheries and aquaculture sector for their livelihoods.
  • Walmart buyers and suppliers use the Seafood Metrics System, managed by the Sustainable Fisheries Partnership (SFP), to measure and track supplier performance on sustainable sourcing.
  • Our ocean initiatives include conservation, restoration of coastal landscapes, and more sustainable management of fisheries and aquaculture. We focus on the aquatic ecosystems that produce major seafood commodities, such as tuna and shrimp, to drive greater actionable data and traceability to activities on the ground so as to address systemic issues like overfishing, bycatch, antibiotic misuse, illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing. We also focus on sustainable livelihoods and promote biodiversity.

Fostering More Sustainable Production of Commodities

Product Specifications

Our sourcing teams seek to procure products and ingredient lines that support our commitment to regeneration and advance our nature goal.

  • Policies and Position Statements: Walmart has developed policies and position statements to articulate for ourselves and for our suppliers the importance of different ecosystems for our business; the practices that support the preservation, conservation, and restoration of these ecosystems; and any sourcing requirements or goals we have set for our assortment. Examples include our Forests Policy, Seafood Policy, Sustainable Row Crop Position Statement, and Walmart U.S. Pollinator Health Position. Read more: Walmart Policies and Guidelines.
  • Certifications. Credible, science-based certifications and standards play an important role. These help to focus and align adoption of practices to support sustainability, even across complex supply chains. In some instances, credible third-party certifications help us validate that products meet a more sustainable standard than conventional products. Certifications can help suppliers focus on practices that improve sustainability and can provide third-party verification that the standards have been met. See the table below for a list of commodities we seek to source utilizing credible third-party certifications.

Certifications Supporting Walmart’s Nature Goals & Commitments

CommodityCertification
Palm OilRoundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), Rainforest Alliance
CoffeeUTZ-Rainforest Alliance, Fair Trade USA
Pulp & PaperForest Stewardship Council, Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification, Sustainable Forestry Initiative
Farm-Raised Seafood & Wild-Caught SeafoodMarine Stewardship Council (MSC) or Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP), or certified by a program which follows Food and Agriculture Organization guidelines and is recognized by the Global Sustainable Seafood Initiative (GSSI), or active participation in FIP with definitive, ambition goals, measurable metrics, and timebound milestones
CottonBetter Cotton, Cotton USA, Organic, recycled cotton, Fair Trade USA
Bananas & Pineapples
Rainforest Alliance, Sustainably Grown or Fair-Trade USA

Where third-party verification through credible certifications is not yet an option, we use alternative strategies as described throughout this brief.

Encouraging Suppliers to Engage and Report Progress

We seek to expand our impact by encouraging suppliers to pursue ambitious nature initiatives and report their annual progress through Project Gigaton.

Project Gigaton™ is a Walmart initiative that aims to inspire suppliers to reduce upstream and downstream greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the global value chain, with six arenas for action: energy, waste, packaging, transportation, product use and design, and—relevant here—nature. Since 2017, more than 4,500 suppliers have joined Project Gigaton and more than 3,400 of those suppliers have set SMART (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant and Time-limited) goals with a target of avoiding one billion metric tons (a gigaton) of emissions from supplier global value chains by 2030. Our Project Gigaton platform offers resources such as calculators to help suppliers set and report on goals, workshops on best practices, and curated links to additional resources provided by Walmart or third parties.

While we launched Project Gigaton to focus on emissions, initiatives related to nature can not only help avoid or sequester greenhouse gases, they can also enhance overall ecosystem health in terms of enhanced soil health, water quality, biodiversity and other nature metrics. A recent CDP report states that “[f]orest conservation is one of the most cost-effective approaches to mitigating climate change and ensuring the preservation of nature and livelihoods.” Accordingly, we engage suppliers to set ambitious goals and report on nature-related actions related to agriculture and forests:

  • With respect to agriculture, we engage suppliers to work on and report on fertilizer optimization, manure management, grazing optimization, and soil management. For example, we are encouraging our Walmart U.S. and Sam’s Club U.S. fresh beef suppliers to improve grazing management and grain sourcing practices across 12 million acres in their U.S. supply chain. According to WWF, well-managed grazing can accelerate carbon sequestration and can also help secure clean water, enhance habitats, and sustain rural communities. As of FY2022, our fresh beef suppliers report implementing sustainable grazing management practices on over half a million acres. Additionally, in FY2022, 50 suppliers reported participation in fertilizer optimization practices or other soil health programs, covering more than 3 million acres.
  • With respect to forests, we encourage suppliers to report on initiatives aligned with our forest goals as well as our Project Gigaton emissions avoidance targets, including the volume of certified palm oil, recycled paper, certified timber, and restoration initiatives. We also encourage suppliers to report through CDP’s forest survey, which feeds into Project Gigaton.

As of the end of FY2022, more than 550 suppliers are reporting progress through Project Gigaton’s Nature pillar. Looking ahead, we plan to enhance reporting beyond forest and agriculture initiatives to capture additional supplier goals and progress regarding natural ecosystems.

Supporting Suppliers with Resources and Best Practice Sharing

To promote best practices, we provide resources and create forums for suppliers, merchants and subject matter experts to share and learn. Recent examples include:

  • Walmart Sustainability HubThe Hub houses resources such as guidance on target setting, background information on Walmart sustainability strategies for key commodities and issues, our nature portal (which includes information about place-based sourcing opportunities), tools (e.g., Recycling Playbook), links to the Project Gigaton platform, and recordings of topical webinars and summits.
  • Place-Based Project Connectors: We provide information about place-based and jurisdictional initiatives through the Nature section of the sustainability hub, to encourage collaboration between suppliers, non-profits, and other stakeholders on landscape-level initiatives.
  • Project Gigaton “calculators”: These calculators are designed to help suppliers identify improvement opportunities and translate actions into impact on emissions or other variables, including nature metrics.
  • Commodity Summits:  We host summits on commodities relevant to nature where our merchants, suppliers, and stakeholders discuss sourcing strategies, aspirations, achievements, and challenges. These summits offer a chance to discuss necessary behavioral shifts, surface innovating and promising practices, and highlight resources to help drive action. Since 2020, we have held summits for tuna, beef and row crops.
  • Joint Sustainability Planning: Walmart invites top sustainability and business leaders from strategic suppliers to engage in joint sustainability planning sessions where we share experiences, ambitions and feedback with the goal of advancing sustainability initiatives—including Project Gigaton, packaging, and place-based initiatives—together. These connections continue throughout the year, with dozens of meetings with suppliers on sustainability-related topics.

Supporting Collective Action

In 2019, scientists proposed the Global Deal for Nature, a science-driven plan calling on global leaders to formally protect 30% of the Earth—with an additional 20% be designated as climate stabilization areas—by 2030, in an attempt to keep average global temperatures below 1.5°C. Lasting change will only be possible through the collective actions of many, so we support multi-stakeholder initiatives that help to accelerate progress towards our nature goals and provide a foundation for sustainable sourcing. Examples include:

  • Grasslands and Agriculture:
    • Walmart is a founding member of the Midwest Row Crop Collaborative (MRCC). Over the last several years, the MRCC has helped implement sustainable agriculture practices on more than a 350,000 acres in the upper Mississippi River Basin. It brings together retailers, suppliers and conservation organizations to help farmers in the U.S. heartland adopt farming practices that can reduce GHG emissions, improve soil health and water quality, and lower costs. In 2021, MRCC announced new goals that reflect the collective desired ambition of members for a more regenerative agricultural system, including: achieving 30 million acres in the Midwest with improved outcomes for soil health, greenhouse gases, water quality and use, biodiversity, or farmer livelihoods; reducing net on-farm GHG emissions in the Midwest row crop supply chain by 7 million metric tons by 2030; and supporting at least 30,000 Midwestern farm operations in the transition to regenerative agriculture by 2030.
    • Walmart is a member of Field to Market: The Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture, a U.S.-based collaboration building and promoting science-based tools and resources and increased supply-chain transparency. Field to Market’s member organizations include farmers, agribusiness companies, brands, retailers, civil society, academia and public sector partners. Walmart provides an opportunity for suppliers to input data generated by the Field to Market Fieldprint Platform directly into Project Gigaton, facilitating suppliers using the tool with a helpful way to report their progress.
    • Walmart is a member of Better Cotton, which is the largest cotton sustainability program in the world. Together with its partners, Better Cotton provides training on more sustainable farming practices reaching more than 2 million cotton farmers across 23 countries in the 2019-2020 cotton season. In 2021, an estimated 30 billion gallons of water were saved, an estimated 150,000 pounds of pesticides were avoided, and Better Cotton Farmers benefited from an estimated $55 million in additional profit thanks to Walmart’s sourcing of Better Cotton.30
    • Walmart is a member of the Sustainable Apparel Coalition (SAC) and a Walmart representative serves on the SAC Board of Directors. Among SAC’s focus areas is scaling use of the Higg Index suite of tools, which generally relate to efforts to conserve and protect natural resources. For example, the Higg Facility Environmental Module (Higg FEM) provides facility-level benchmarking across seven key environmental performance indicators, including water usage, waste water, air pollution, and chemicals management. As of FY2022, the percentage of net product sales in apparel and soft home categories for Walmart U.S. sourced from suppliers reporting that at least one facility has completed the Sustainable Apparel Coalition’s Higg FEM assessment has grown to over 94%.
  • Forests and Forest Commodities: In an effort to work collaboratively to stop forest loss, Walmart joined many of the world’s largest manufacturers and retailers as a member of the Consumer Good Forum’s Forest Positive Coalition. Through this effort, we are part of a group of companies taking action to help reduce deforestation and forest degradation from key supply chains and drive transformative change across the industry. We participate in commodity working groups to engage in stakeholder consultations throughout the year to develop commodity roadmaps and action plans to help deliver a forest positive future. Walmart is also a member of the World Economic Forum’s Tropical Forest Alliance collective action forum.
  • Oceans and Seafood: Since 2015, Walmart has been a member of The Seafood Task Force, an international, multi-stakeholder initiative to address forced labor and illegal fishing in the Thai seafood industry. We have been a Board member since 2016 and participate in several working subgroups. The Seafood Task Force aims to help stop overfishing in fishmeal and tuna supply chains; help remove natural habitat conversion/deforestation from shrimp supply chains; and help reduce land use, water use, energy use and wild fish use in shrimp supply chains through a wide range of tools and resources. In June 2022, we joined Ocean Conservancy’s Global Ghost Gear Initiative (GGGI), a global alliance solely dedicated to solving the problem of abandoned, lost or otherwise discarded fishing gear (also known as "ghost gear"), one of the most harmful forms of marine debris. According to Ocean Conservancy, up to a 30 percent decline in some fish stocks can be attributed to ghost gear.

Supporting Conservation & Restoration

Acres for America

In 2005, Walmart committed to preserve at least one acre of natural habitat for every acre of land developed by the company in the U.S. through the Walmart Acres for America program, administered by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF). NFWF reports that the program has since become one of the most effective public-private land conservation partnership in the U.S.

Over the past 17 years, Acres for America has helped to protect more than 1.8 million acres across 42 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico — an area larger than Everglades National Park. As of FY2021, the acres we have helped preserve is more than seven times the number of acres we have developed. The program, renewed in 2015 for another decade, has funded more than 100 projects and has leveraged Walmart’s $60 million investment with matching contributions that have generated a total conservation impact of more than $1 billion. The grants awarded in 2021 leveraged an additional $131 million in matching contributions from grantees and their project partners for a total conservation impact of $136 million. More information about specific places conserved through the Acres for America program—including several projects protecting forests, grasslands, and wetlands—is available on the NFWF website.

Acres for America—Example Projects

Title: Protecting Mt. Taylor Traditional Cultural Properties for the Marquez Wildlife Management Area (NM)
Organization: The Trust for Public Land
Year: 2021
Award Amount: $1,000,000.00
Description: Acquire 52,870 acres of the Mt. Taylor Traditional Cultural Properties in central New Mexico to secure important wildlife while also preserving important cultural resources and providing new recreational opportunities. Project will benefit a large suite of species who rely on this area and enhance connectivity between existing protected lands.

Title: Conserving Indigenous Rappahannock Ancestral Lands at Fones Cliffs on the Rappahannock River (VA)
Year: 2021
Organization: Rappahannock Tribe of Virginia
Grant Amount: $500,000
Description: The Rappahannock Tribe of Virginia will acquire 484 acres of indigenous ancestral homelands on the Rappahannock River to conserve as a natural area and to use for educational purposes befitting the Tribe and the public. The project will protect wetland and forest habitat adjacent to other protected lands and will benefit breeding and migratory habitat for bald eagles, ospreys, and waterfowl.

Title: Conserve Threatened Forest and Forested Wetland Habitat in the Pelican River Forest (WI)
Organization: The Conservation Fund, A Nonprofit Corporation
Year: 2021
Award Amount: $600,000.00
Description: Acquire 69,000 acres of privately owned forest and wetland habitat in the Pelican River Forest in Wisconsin to permanently protect habitat while securing public access and sustainable forest management. Project will protect valuable habitat for wolves, northern goshawks, cerulean warblers, and other key species, creating a land bridge between adjacent protected forest lands.

Title: Conserving the Cumberland Forest in Tennessee
Organization: The Nature Conservancy
Year: 2020
Award Amount: $620,000.00
Description: Conserve at least 15,000 acres in Tennessee for public recreation, sustainable forestry, and wildlife habitat management in the Central Appalachians. Project will ensure the protection of habitat for multiple, high priority aquatic and terrestrial species; provide critical habitat linkage of over 280,000 acres between Tennessee and Kentucky; generate revenues for the local economy via sustainable forestry; and support outdoor recreation.

Title: Loess Hills Prairie and Woodland Protection (IA)
Organization: Iowa Department of Natural Resources
Year: 2019
Award Amount: $270,000.00
Description: Protect an 834-acre tract of untilled prairie and oak woodland in the Loess Hills of western Plymouth County, Iowa. Project will connect existing protected lands, prevent fragmentation from development, and ensure wildlife populations and their habitat are properly managed.

LEAF Coalition

In November 2021, Walmart.org joined the LEAF Coalition, a new public-private initiative designed to accelerate climate action by providing results-based finance to national and sub-national jurisdictions committed to protecting and restoring their tropical forests. The LEAF Coalition seeks to mobilize at least $1 billion in finance to support substantial reductions in emissions from deforestation while fostering conservation and restoration that will deliver tangible benefits for local communities and nature. In May 2022, the LEAF Coalition opened the submission window, inviting forest jurisdictions to submit proposals to become eligible suppliers of emissions reduction credits.

Encouraging Development of Place-Based Projects

Walmart and the Walmart Foundation support the development of place-based and jurisdictional projects, which are new management approaches that create shared value for producers, suppliers, and communities across a landscape or seascape through activities that restore and rebuild the natural resources communities depend on and that produce the goods Walmart sells.

Place-based projects work by:

  • Creating regenerative commodity production across a landscape or seascape;
  • Fostering adoption of regenerative practices through multiple approaches including changes to public policy and stronger sourcing standards; and
  • Collaboratively engaging a landscape’s stakeholders to define problems, implement solutions, and measure impact.

Walmart seeks to develop, participate in, and connect suppliers with place-based initiatives that show potential to deliver positive nature impacts at the landscape and seascape levels. Current place-based and jurisdictional projects from which Walmart sources include:

  • Pacific Island Tuna: In FY2022, Walmart partnered with The Nature Conservancy (TNC) and the government of the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) to source tuna certified to Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) standards for our private brand and support communities throughout RMI. TNC reports that the initiative aspires to distribute at least 40% of PIT’s net income to directly support community-based conservation and climate resilience projects including the development and management of Marine Protected Areas and coral reef restoration. Pacific Island Tuna is designed to deliver industry-leading environmental, labor, and traceability standards; set a benchmark for industry action; and showcase how innovative sourcing practices can be used to benefit local communities.
  • Arkansas Rice: Walmart initiated a place-based project in collaboration with Indigo Ag to source Great Value Rice from Arkansas. 2021 was the project’s pilot year and it has expanded in scope and volume in 2022. The project is focused on incentivizing landscape-level changes by working with multiple actors in the value chain. Rice farmers enrolled in the project implemented on-farm practices that demonstrate water and land stewardship, including crop rotation from legumes (such as soybeans), zero-grade rice production, multiple-inlet irrigation with computerized hole-selection, and furrow irrigation. Anticipated outcomes include a reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and water conservation.

Beyond sourcing from place-based and jurisdictional initiatives, the Walmart Foundation provides capacity-building support to develop strategies, technical capacity and organizational structures of place-based and jurisdictional initiatives that are not yet mature. For example:

  • In FY2021, the Walmart Foundation provided a grant to WWF for a new collaboration with cattle ranchers across the Northern Great Plains. The project will help fight the climate crisis by improving the health of one million acres of grasslands, increasing underground carbon storage, filtering clean water and providing habitat for wildlife. WWF will assist ranchers in developing and implementing whole ranch management plans designed to achieve ecological and economic outcomes. In FY2022, WWF reported that 16 ranches have signed up for the program, over 150,000 acres were enrolled in sustainable management, and an estimated 3.24-7.72 MT GHG emissions will be avoided through no-conversion agreement.
  • In FY2022, the Walmart Foundation supported Conservation International (CI) to help develop a jurisdictional approach in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean focused on tuna fisheries management and conservation, starting with country-wide approaches, and developing roadmaps to scale regionally. CI is in the process of scoping and co-designing jurisdictional initiatives in Fiji and New Caledonia with key government and industry stakeholders. Regionally, CI is also working with the Pacific Community (PC) and with other partners to strengthen the climate resilience of tuna fisheries in the Pacific Island region.
  • In 2021, the Walmart Foundation made a grant to Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) to help protect and restore 100,000 hectares of critically important peatland forest in northern Sumatra while creating an inclusive and collaborative partnership with local stakeholders that aligns conservation, restoration, and sustainable agricultural production across the landscape. To do this, WCS is working with 1,000 smallholder farmers in the region, providing training and support to help increase palm oil yields and improve livelihoods while helping avoid further loss of forest and peatlands.
  • In FY2022, the Walmart Foundation provided a grant to The Nature Conservancy to establish a place-based initiative in the Southern High Plains, one of North America’s largest prairie landscapes, encompassing 71 million acres that are under threat. Through this place-based initiative, The Nature Conservancy will help cattle ranchers identify and implement regenerative ranching practices and work with local stakeholders, government, and the beef supply chain to develop and begin implementation of a 3-year sustainable management strategy and action plan for the landscape.
  • In 2021, Walmart Foundation made a grant to Instituto de Pesquisa Ambiental da Amazonia (IPAM) to help strengthen smallholder livelihoods, reduce deforestation, and advance a low-carbon economy in the Brazilian Amazon. To do this, IPAM is working to help improve state environmental licensing processes to regularize rural properties, adapting the CONSERV program to unlock compensation for smallholders who conserve forest on their properties, as well as expanding access to technical assistance and rural extension services for smallholders.

Advocating For and Investing in an Enabling Environment

We leverage our business and philanthropic strengths to advocate for and invest in enablers of systemic change to create an environment that supports the protection, management, and restoration of natural ecosystems. Through philanthropy, we extend the reach of the business by supporting innovations, research, practice adoption and local collaborations.

Policy Advocacy: Recent examples of our public policy advocacy on nature-related issues includes.

  • Recognizing bipartisan action on climate and submitting a letter of support to the U.S. Senate regarding the passage of the Growing Climate Solutions Act, which provides technical resources to farmers and ranchers to invest in nature-based climate solutions.
  • Joining the Business for Nature (BFN) and International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) business delegation at the UN Open-Ended Working Group (OEWG) meeting in Geneva to support the development of a meaningful global agreement on nature. The OEWG is tasked with advancing preparations for the development of the post-2020 global biodiversity framework, to be adopted in 2022 in Kunming, China (COP 15). Governments welcomed the presence of the business delegation and the progressive proposals put forward ahead of this important meeting.

Coalitions: To shape an enabling public policy environment, we engage with coalitions like Business for Nature (BFN), which brings together business and conservation organizations to call for governments to adopt policies to reverse nature loss in this decade. In 2020, we supported BFN's Call to Action to reverse nature loss by 2030. BFN has been mobilizing members to provide official comment to inform the global biodiversity framework that is set to be negotiated at the UN COP15 in 2022. We have actively participated in the drafting and development of these policy recommendations and been a strong proponent of language that highlights that the climate and nature dialogues should be strongly linked, and recognize the critical role nature plays in climate mitigation. Walmart is also a member of the Consumer Goods Forum Forest Positive Coalition and the World Economic Forum Tropical Forest Alliance collective action forum.

Philanthropic Investments: Walmart and the Walmart Foundation use philanthropy to complement and extend the work of our business. In FY2021 and FY2022, Walmart and the Walmart Foundation invested more than $14 million to help preserve irreplaceable landscapes by supporting innovative approaches that can help address gaps in the way the system works today. Our investments are intended to help strengthen certification and practice measurement, develop tools to support actionable data and transparency, and build capacity for place-based and jurisdictional projects that aim to transform a geographic area. Examples include:

  • ISEAL Alliance: ISEAL works to increase the uptake of credible standards in critical regions. Sub-national governments are making strides in designing and implementing programs towards deforestation-free agriculture. With FY2021 Walmart Foundation funding, ISEAL developed a roadmap for company engagement in landscape initiatives. This will link motivations and pathways for engagement with tools that can support companies both within and beyond their supply chains, evolve and define the role of certifications in validating landscape initiatives, and develop technical guidance to improve alignment on engagement and claims.
  • The Nature Conservancy (TNC): TNC uses science-based approaches that incorporate multi-stakeholder input into solutions in order to benefit nature and people. A Walmart Foundation grant made in FY2021 funds TNC to help advance transparency tools for vessels at sea through two key workstreams: (1) connecting satellite monitoring to electronic monitoring on vessels to surface overfishing and sustainability threats in partnership with Global Fishing Watch with research support from University of California (Santa Barbara) and (2) aiming to accelerate the scale of electronic monitoring on longline vessels in the Western and Central Pacific.
  • Wolfes Neck Farm Foundation Inc: Wolfes Neck’s stated mission is to transform our relationship with farming and food for a healthier planet. A Walmart Foundation grant made in FY2022 funds Wolfes Neck to develop their open and collaboratively developed agricultural technology platform, OpenTEAM, through piloting and testing by over 800 farmers. The OpenTEAM program, through local technical assistance providers (known as OpenTEAM Fellows), will collect farmer data and connect farmers to various partner platforms and tools to help them understand the environmental and economic impacts of their farm, identify potential practice changes, and learn more about supply chain initiatives and ecosystem markets.

Information on all Walmart and Walmart Foundation grants of $25,000 and greater is available at Walmart.org.

Challenges

  • Environmental challenges in supply chains are complex and are often the result of systemic issues including deeply entrenched economic practices and inconsistent government regulation and enforcement across countries in which products are made. These factors make it challenging for any single organization to have an impact.  
  • Science can be unsettled and scientists may disagree about the causes or optimal solutions for nature-related problems. Issues intersect, trade-offs may be required, and competing considerations balanced.
  • As we work toward the achievement of our goals and commitments, the science, available data, and methodologies for measurement of impact continue to evolve. As we continue to align to the latest science and available data, our methodologies may evolve as well, which may necessitate revising or restating previously reported metrics.
  • Sustainable product aspirations are dependent on the maturity, rigor, and efficacy of third-party standards and initiatives, and there are limits to the efficacy of tools used to monitor compliance with expectations.  
  • The success of sustainable product programs is dependent on suppliers’ capacity and willingness to meet high standards, as well as their performance and ability to scale practices across their supply chains. Innovation in manufacturing, agriculture and other product production technologies is necessary.  
  • Nature-related issues in supply chains are often upstream and beyond the reach of traditional retailer oversight and monitoring tools. Lack of reliable data on source/origin of certain commodities and product ingredients and the way they are produced—as well as the blending and commoditization of product inputs and ingredients—complicates matters. The use of technology improving transparency and traceability (e.g., blockchain, vessel monitoring) can help, but adoption takes time and further innovation is necessary to meet these challenges.  
  • The breadth of Walmart's global product offerings and dispersed geographical reach of supply chains can present challenges for supplier engagement and nature-related risk identification and mitigation. Moreover, certain products can only be obtained from specific regions of the world, limiting options for alternative sources. 
  • Walmart’s ability to scale more sustainable options is dependent on customer preferences and demand (which can depend on the cost and convenience of such options) and the availability and cost of preferred products, ingredients, commodities, and inputs. Growth in and/or changes in our business can challenge our ability to meet customer demands consistent with our aspirations.  
  • The public policy environment in certain countries/regions does not support (and may undermine) more sustainable production at scale and at reasonable cost.  
  • Pandemics, weather-related events, and political/social unrest can create supply/demand volatility and interrupt supply chains.  

Revision History: October 2022: Updated FY2021 and FY2022 Walmart U.S. cotton metrics.
About Our Reporting

Endnotes

1. Walmart and the Walmart Foundation have committed to help protect, more sustainably manage, or restore at least 50 million acres of land and 1 million square miles of ocean by 2030. We work towards this commitment by engaging our suppliers to foster more sustainable production of commodities such as beef, row crops, coffee, paper, and tuna to meet consumer demand while promoting forest, field, and ocean health through sourcing requirements, best practice sharing, industry consortia, and philanthropy. We also encourage the development of “place-based projects” and advocate for and invest in enablers of systemic change. To track progress towards our goal, we collaborated with expert, science-based NGOs to develop a methodology to calculate spatial area engaged. More information on our methodology may be found on our Sustainability Hub. As we focus on the work of moving practices along a good/better/best maturity path, we anticipate that the science of natural protection, management and restoration—as well as methodologies for impact measurement and spatial area conversion—will continue to evolve. And as we continue to align to the latest science, our approach to calculating and reporting on results may also evolve. We plan to report on the progress towards our commitment before the end of 2022.

2. Our Project Gigaton Nature pillar is new as of FY2022. For FY2021, we calculated this metric based on the suppliers who reported through the Forests and/or Agriculture pillars. As of FY2022 these are the basis for our Nature pillar.

3. Tracked on the FishChoice platform, FisheryProgress.org. Publicly registered FIPs include FIPs and Pre-FIPs, both of which are registered with Fishsource.

4. Suppliers were asked to report through the Seafood Metrics System the total volume of the fresh and frozen, wild-caught and farmed, seafood shipped in FY2021 and the volume of that seafood that met Walmart’s requirements (certified by a designated program or in a FIP or AIP). Suppliers representing approximately 100% of Walmart US, 100% of Sam’s Club U.S., 96% of Canada, and 61% of Mexico national volume of fresh and frozen, wild-caught and farmed, seafood shipped in FY2021 responded. Reported volumes were validated against Sustainable Fisheries Partnership records and Walmart business data showing supplier shipments. Central America reporting is based on reports from suppliers representing 100% of Walmart Central America fresh and frozen, wild-caught and farmed seafood in CY2020.

5. Suppliers were asked to report through the Seafood Metrics System the total volume of the fresh and frozen, wild-caught and farmed, seafood shipped in FY2022 and the volume of that seafood that met Walmart’s requirements (certified by a designated program or in a FIP or AIP). Suppliers representing approximately 100% of Walmart U.S., 100% of Sam’s Club U.S., and 45% of Mexico volume of fresh and frozen, wild-caught and farmed, seafood shipped in FY2022 responded. Reported volumes were validated against Sustainable Fisheries Partnership records and Walmart business data showing supplier shipments. Central America reporting is based on reports from suppliers representing 100% of Walmart Central America fresh and frozen, wild-caught and farmed seafood in CY2021. Walmart Mexico's FY2022 reporting may not be comparable to prior years' reporting due to a change in methodology to include national and import suppliers in FY2022, with resulting impacts to both the scope of the calculation and supplier response rate. Canada figures are forthcoming in 2022 following the completion of data validation.

6. Suppliers were asked to report through the Seafood Metrics System the total volume of the fresh and frozen, wild-caught, seafood shipped in FY2021 and the volume of that seafood that met Walmart’s requirements (certified by a designated program or in a FIP). Suppliers representing approximately 100% of Walmart US, 100% of Sam’s Club U.S., 96% of Canada, and 61% of Mexico national volume of fresh and frozen, wild-caught, seafood shipped in FY2021 responded. Reported volumes were validated against Sustainable Fisheries Partnership records and Walmart business data showing supplier shipments. Central America reporting is based on reports from suppliers representing 100% of Walmart Central America fresh and frozen, wild-caught seafood in CY2020.

7. Suppliers were asked to report through the Seafood Metrics System the total volume of the fresh and frozen, wild-caught, seafood shipped in FY2022 and the volume of that seafood that met Walmart’s requirements (certified by a designated program or in a FIP or AIP). Suppliers representing approximately 100% of Walmart US, 100% of Sam’s Club U.S., 98% of Canada, and 45% of Mexico volume of fresh and frozen, wild-caught, seafood shipped in FY2022 responded. Reported volumes were validated against Sustainable Fisheries Partnership records and Walmart business data showing supplier shipments. Central America reporting is based on reports from suppliers representing 100% of Walmart Central America fresh and frozen, wild-caught seafood in CY2021. Walmart Mexico's FY2022 reporting may not be comparable to prior years' reporting due to a change in methodology to include national and import suppliers in FY2022, with resulting impacts to both the scope of the calculation and supplier response rate.

8. Suppliers were asked to report through the Seafood Metrics System the total volume of the fresh and frozen, farmed, seafood shipped in FY2021 and the volume of that seafood that met Walmart’s requirements (certified by a designated program or in a FIP). Suppliers representing approximately 100% of Walmart US, 100% of Sam’s Club U.S., 96% of Canada, and 61% of Mexico national volume of fresh and frozen, farmed, seafood shipped in FY2021 responded. Reported volumes were validated against Sustainable Fisheries Partnership records and Walmart business data showing supplier shipments. Central America reporting is based on reports from suppliers representing 100% of Walmart Central America fresh and frozen, farmed seafood in CY2020.

9. Suppliers were asked to report through the Seafood Metrics System the total volume of the fresh and frozen, farmed, seafood shipped in FY2022 and the volume of that seafood that met Walmart’s requirements (certified by a designated program or in an AIP). Suppliers representing approximately 100% of Walmart US, 100% of Sam’s Club U.S., 98% of Canada, and 45% of Mexico volume of fresh and frozen, farmed, seafood shipped in FY2022 responded. Reported volumes were validated against Sustainable Fisheries Partnership records and Walmart business data showing supplier shipments. Central America reporting is based on reports from suppliers representing 100% of Walmart Central America fresh and frozen, farmed seafood in CY2021. Walmart Mexico's FY2022 reporting may not be comparable to prior years' reporting due to a change in methodology to include national and import suppliers in FY2022, with resulting impacts to both the scope of the calculation and supplier response rate.

10. Based on price, availability, quality, customer demand, and unique regulatory environments across our global retail markets. Read the full policy: https://corporate.walmart.com/policies#seafood-policy. As tracked on the FishChoice platform, FisheryProgress.org. Publicly registered FIPs include FIPs and Pre-FIPs, both of which are registered with Fishsource.

11. Sustainably sourced: Certified by a designated program or in a FIP.

12. Tuna suppliers were asked to report through the Seafood Metrics System the total volume of tuna shipped to Walmart in FY2021 and the volume of that product that met Walmart’s seafood policy requirements (certified by a designated program or in a FIP). Suppliers representing approximately 100% of Walmart U.S., 100% of Sam’s Club U.S., and 98% of Canada volume in FY2021 responded. Reported volumes were validated against Sustainable Fisheries Partnership records and Walmart business data showing supplier shipments. Walmart U.S. figures are for private brand and national brand tuna. Walmart U.S. and Sam’s Club U.S. figures are for all shelf-stable tuna (includes canned and pouched).

13. Tuna suppliers were asked to report through the Seafood Metrics System the total volume of tuna shipped to Walmart in FY2022 and the volume of that product that met Walmart’s seafood policy requirements (certified by a designated program or in a FIP). Suppliers representing 100% of Walmart U.S. and Sam’s Club U.S. volume in FY2022 responded. Reported volumes were validated against Sustainable Fisheries Partnership records and Walmart business data showing supplier shipments. Walmart U.S. figures are for private brand and national brand tuna. Walmart U.S. and Sam’s Club U.S. figures are for all shelf-stable tuna (includes canned and pouched). Canada figures are forthcoming in 2022 following the completion of data validation.

14. Certifications: UTZ-Rainforest Alliance and/or Fair Trade USA.

15. Walmart U.S. data was as of September 2019

16. Certification: UTZ-Rainforest Alliance

17. Covers tea sourced from July 1, 2021 through January 31, 2022

18. Certifications include Rainforest Alliance, Sustainably Grown and Fair Trade USA. Goal originally included Asda, Walmart’s U.K. business. Walmart divested its retail operations in the U.K. in February 2021. Going forward, we will no longer disclose progress for our divested operations.

19. Percentages are based on volume of bananas and pineapples sourced under an annual alignment. Spot buy volume due to sporadic increase of demand or rejections or delay of shipping to ensure surety of supply is not included. Spot buys may or may not be sustainability certified.

20. In accordance with the principles and criteria of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) segregated supply chain systems, or equivalent standards. Prior years’ reporting on certified palm oil included both mass balance and segregated/higher. Walmart reset its palm oil goal in 2021 to focus on segregated palm oil or equivalent.

21.Suppliers supplying Walmart private brand products in departments most likely to contain palm oil were identified and encouraged to participate in Walmart’s palm oil survey. Excluding suppliers who responded to the survey and stated that they do not supply Walmart with products containing palm oil, suppliers representing 92% of the relevant business responded; in FY2021 the response rate was 66%. The percentage of supplier-reported palm oil volumes in Walmart private brand products certified as sustainable is the quotient of the volume of certified palm oil divided by total volume of palm oil, per the supplier survey responses.

22. We updated our goal in 2020 to “By 2025, source private brand products made of pulp, paper, and timber deforestation and conversion-free. Implement sustainable pulp, paper, and timber procurement practices that promote sustainable management, conservation, protection and restoration of the world’s forests.”

23. Certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC), Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI). Suppliers supplying Walmart private brand products in departments most likely to contain pulp and paper were identified and encouraged to participate in Walmart’s pulp and paper survey. Excluding suppliers who responded to the survey and stated that they do not supply Walmart with products containing pulp and paper, suppliers representing 74% of the relevant business responded in FY2021 and 89% responded in FY2022. The percentage of supplier-reported pulp and paper volumes in Walmart private brand products certified as sustainable or containing recycled content is the quotient of the volume of certified or recycled pulp and paper divided by total volume of pulp and paper, per the supplier survey responses.

24. Man-made cellulosic fibers include rayon/viscose, modal, lyocell, acetate and trademarked versions. Forest information is per non-profit organization Canopy.

25. As indicated by a Canopy "Green Shirt" ranking.

26. Supplier-reported data for total cotton volume sourced through one of the following: Cotton USA, Organic, Fair Trade USA, or Recycled Cotton. Results are based on supplier survey responses. Better Cotton Initiative data was derived from BCI’s Better Cotton Platform data.

27. Through our work with Conservation International, we identified beef production as using the largest amount of land—primarily for grazing—followed by the commodity row crops of wheat, corn/maize, soybeans, rice, and cotton, forest products like cocoa, coffee, pulp/paper/timber, and palm oil, as well as seafood commodities like tuna, shrimp, and salmon.

28. Row crops include wheat, corn, soy, rice, and cotton. Regeneration of row crops is assessed both as products that we sell as well as ingredients in products that we sell.

29. The USDA Economic Research Service (ERS) has published a Major Land Uses study every five years since 1945. The data we include in our report is pulled from the latest USDA ERS study, dated August 2012, but published in August 2017. A new report is expected in August 2022.

30. Better Cotton Farmers experience profit increases for a variety of reasons, most commonly due to increased yields and/or optimized use of inputs (such as irrigation water, pesticides or synthetic fertilizer).

31. During our FY22 quality assurance review for our FY21 comparative period, we identified a calculation error resulting from our transition to using Better Cotton Platform data instead of supplier-reported BCI data. We have restated our reporting to correct this error.

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