Creating Jobs Through What We Buy

By Michelle Gloeckler
March 10, 2016
Blonde woman and man with microphone sit in chairs on a stage

At Harvard’s Social Enterprise Conference this weekend, the topic on top of everyone’s mind was how to solve big problems. Attendees talked about many ways to create change: whether it’s through launching a startup, investing in green energy, or innovation in education.

I spoke about Walmart’s commitment to buy $250 billion over 10 years in products that support American jobs. Through this commitment, we are empowering our customers to help create jobs and be agents of change through what they buy. 

Since we launched our commitment, we’ve worked with hundreds of suppliers to encourage them to manufacture or assemble their products here. As a retailer, we don’t make anything, but we’re big and want to use our strength to help others. We’ve made good progress.

In some cases we’ve agreed to longer-term contracts to give suppliers the confidence to grow their business in America such as our commitment to Wadley Holdings which makes patio furniture in Wadley, Alabama. With a population of just 700, the company recently added 50 full-time jobs to the region as a result of our commitment and is planning to add an additional 50 jobs next year. 

Or you can start small and grow with us. Take Ed Mueller, founder of Carolina Gumbaya of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. He started selling his South Carolina seafood gumbo at 17 area Walmart stores. Today, Ed’s gumbo has grown to 137 Walmart stores over five states.

Duncan Berry, founder of Fishpeople knows very well what can happen when you have an idea to create American jobs. He told the audience about how his seafood company is making a difference for the fishermen in the Pacific Northwest. Surprisingly, 90% of the seafood caught in American waters goes overseas for processing. He wanted to change that. And he has. Starting last year he signed a deal with Walmart to sell his sustainably caught and processed fish at our stores. He’s created jobs in Oregon and is doing it sustainably too.

Duncan’s story is inspiring and we’re looking for others to do the same.

For the third year in a row, Walmart is opening its doors June 28 to more than 500 manufacturers and inventors during the company’s “Made in the USA” Open Call for products made, assembled or grown in the U.S. There are no hoops to jump through – no phone calls or pre-pitch meetings. During the event, suppliers will meet with the company’s senior leaders and buyers at our headquarters in Bentonville, Arkansas, to pitch their products for Walmart stores, Sam’s Clubs and Walmart.com. We’ll also have learning academies for our suppliers on topics ranging from the changing customer to how best to work with Walmart. Registration opens March 15 at www.walmart-jump.com.

In a year where everyone wants to create opportunity in their communities, we’re proud to provide customers and entrepreneurs the chance to do that through what they buy at Walmart.

Editor’s Note: This is an excerpt of Michelle’s post that was originally published on LinkedIn Pulse.